Report: Apple prepping $1 billion for TV content Permanent Article Link- Report: Apple prepping $1 billion for TV content

Apple is reportedly about to make a big play for original content.
The Wall Street Journal:

Combined with the company's marketing clout and global reach, the step immediately makes Apple a considerable competitor in a crowded market where both new and traditional media players are vying to acquire original shows. Apple's budget is about half what Time Warner Inc.'s HBO spent on content last year and on par with estimates of what Amazon.com Inc. spent in 2013, the year after it announced its move into original programming.

For persecutive, this is about 1/6 of what Netflix is believed to be spending on original content and about 1/4 of what Amazon is investing. For an initial push, however, that should be a sizable amount on new programming. Likely, both Netflix and Amazon have higher costs as returning programs should be more expensive.




ESPN Apple TV app now shows up to four games at once Permanent Article Link- ESPN Apple TV app now shows up to four games at once

Variety:

A new version of the ESPN App for Apple TV's tvOS, available Wednesday, includes a feature called MultiCast that provides the ability to view up to four simultaneous live streams at once. On any given day, ESPN users can choose from 30 or more live events airing across its networks.

That's cool. This seems like ideal for college football Saturdays when ESPN is broadcasting multiple games at once.

The ESPN app requires a cable subscription and authentication through a supported provider.




Patents and table saw safety Permanent Article Link- Patents and table saw safety

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is considering making a safety device mandatory for construction/woodworking table saws. This is interesting case I think in how brilliant technology and patents can work against each other. The inventor started his own line of saws and have fought power tool makers to force them to license his product for a significant premium.

NPR:

"You commissioners have the power to take one of the most dangerous products ever available to consumers and make it vastly safer," Gass said at the public hearing. "And yet, here we are over 14 years later after this petition was initially filed, still engaged in a glacial process with an uncertain end. There's no time left to waste."

While inventors should be compensated, at the same time it seems disingenuous to demand regulations mandating his product in the name of safety all the while fighting those not willing to pay your terms. If safety is your mission, then I feel the licensing terms should be attractive enough to be widely adopted.

On the flip side, if consumers want to buy his product, they can.

Anyway, the technology is pretty cool and has a demonstration involving a hotdog. In the video below the demo starts around 2:30.

He put an inexpensive little sensing device inside it. And if the saw nicks a finger, within 3/1000ths of a second, it fires a brake that stops the blade. Gass demonstrates this in an epic video using a hot dog in place of a finger. The blade looks like it just vanishes into the table.





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Dropbox adds two-step verification with app Permanent Article Link- Dropbox adds two-step verification with app

Dropbox:

Starting today, you can also use the Dropbox mobile app to verify your identity. When you're signing in, you can have a notification sent to the Dropbox app on your phone, and simply tap a button to finish the process, rather than receiving a text message with a code to enter.

Mobile prompts are especially helpful as a backup when you don't have cell signal, but do have Wi-Fi (for example, on a plane where you can't receive security codes by text message).

This should make it a little easy for all users to utilize two-step verification. Going to the app is probably no easier than using a third-party authenticator app, however, not everyone bothers to set that up and maintain it.




Twelve South announces new BookBook for MacBooks Permanent Article Link- Twelve South announces new BookBook for MacBooks

Twelve South's BookBook is leather case that resembles a vintage book. That company announced BookBook Vol 2 for Apple's latest MacBook laptops. The new versions are designed to house Apple's USB-C MacBooks, which includes the 12-inch MacBook, the 13-inch MacBook Pro, and the 15-inch MacBook pro.

The refreshed design features a design that 42-percent slimmer, a crush resistant spine, and a new hidden portfolio.

The Book Book Vol 2 is available now in three different sizes and all sell for $79.99.




Another iPhone 8 dummy shows black design Permanent Article Link- Another iPhone 8 dummy shows black design

Yesterday I noted a video showing off what's expected to be the design of the next iPhone. It was a white model that I didn't really appeal to me. 9 to 5 Mac notes a clip of what appears to be a black version of that phone.

This one I like much better. My issue was the white bezel around the screen didn't look right to me. Sort of like it had a cheap case. The black bezel looks much better. Check it out.




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Purported iPhone 8 model Permanent Article Link- Purported iPhone 8 model

Michael Kukielka (DetroitBorg) has a video showing a model of how the iPhone 8 is expected to look. The model was provided by Sonny Dickson, who in the past few years have proven to have reliable sources within Apple's supply chain. The model is reportedly being used by case makers to prep products for the next iPhone's launch.

I haven't paid much attention to all the renderings and rumors, but where getting into the final lap of the product cycle and this is a great demo. My first impression is I'm not that crazy about the look. I think the white bezel makes it look strange to me. Sort of like it has a cheap case on the phone. If there's model with a black bezel, I'll probably like that better. I don't like the iPhones with white faces because it's to me it's distracting and a stark contrast from the display. I prefer the more matte look.

We shall see...




Disney planning streaming service for TV, movies Permanent Article Link- Disney planning streaming service for TV, movies

Disney is reportedly pulling its content off of Netflix to launch its own competing streaming service. The service will offer Disney branded content for movies and TV, including Pixar Studio releases.

AP:

The Magic Kingdom is launching its own streaming service for its central Disney and Pixar brands and another for live sports. That would allow it to bypass the cable companies it relies on -- and Netflix -- to charge consumers directly for access to its popular movies and sporting events.


The Disney service is expected not to lunch until 2019. In addition, Disney-owned ESPN franchise is still building its own streaming app. ESPN is expected to expand its streaming offering next year, although will likely not compete directly with cable. This likely means the service will continue to require a cable/dish subscription and not be offered as a stand-alone. If, ESPN continues to lose cable subscribers, it seems poised to begin offering services directly to customers.




iOS 11 beta changes Permanent Article Link- iOS 11 beta changes

iDB has a video rundown of changes in the most recent beta of iOS 11. This is the 5th release and there have been as many iterations of changes. Two things that caught my attention is the iCloud for Messages features have been removed for a future update, perhaps after launch.

The other tidbit is the Facetime ringtone has changed. The new tone is more subdued lower frequency tone that isn't as piercing.




Author of password rules admits his mistakes Permanent Article Link- Author of password rules admits his mistakes

Bill Burr apparently is the source of many current day password rules. These rules are nothing but arbitrary and annoying. Most often, they seem to encourage worse password management. Rather than people having a strong password, they need to write down passwords to keep track of nonsensical rules that force constant change. Often these passwords are stored in an unencrypted document or just written next to a computer, they can be easy pickings for someone looking to compromise a system.

The Wall Street Journal

Bill Burr's 2003 report recommended using numbers, obscure characters and capital letters and updating regularly--he regrets the error

The man who wrote the book on password management has a confession to make: He blew it.
The document became a sort of Hammurabi Code of passwords, the go-to guide for federal agencies, universities and large companies looking for a set of password-setting rules to follow.

The problem is the advice ended up largely incorrect, Mr. Burr says. Change your password every 90 days? Most people make minor changes that are easy to guess, he laments. Changing Pa55word!1 to Pa55word!2 doesn't keep the hackers at bay.

Also off the mark: demanding a letter, number, uppercase letter and special character such as an exclamation point or question mark--a finger-twisting requirement.

"Much of what I did I now regret," said Mr. Burr, 72 years old, who is now retired.

The best solution is to use password management software, such as 1Password. Even still I often find very strong passwords get rejected by automated password enforcement based on these rules, which is incredibly annoying.






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